Practice Can Make Search-and-Rescue Robot Operators More Accurate

Science Daily - 'The World Trade Center site was the first major real-world evaluation of robots as tools for USAR,' says Keith Jones, an HF/E researcher at Texas Tech University. 'Overall, the robots performed well. One problem that did surface, however, was that the robots got stuck, a lot.' Jones, with coauthors Brian Johnson and Elizabeth Schmidlin, published a study of USAR robot teleoperation in a special issue of the Journal of Cognitive Engineering and Decision Making on human-robot interaction.

Urban search and rescue (USAR) task forces are essential for locating, stabilizing, and extricating people who become trapped in confined spaces following a catastrophic event.

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"The World Trade Center site was the first major real-world evaluation of robots as tools for USAR," says Keith Jones, an HF/E researcher at Texas Tech University. "Overall, the robots performed well. One problem that did surface, however, was that the robots got stuck, a lot." Jones, with coauthors Brian Johnson and Elizabeth Schmidlin, published a study of USAR robot teleoperation in a special issue of the Journal of Cognitive Engineering and Decision Making on human-robot interaction.

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