An Entertaining and Educational Graphic Novel Textbook

Graphic Novel Reporter - Jeremy Short (professor in Texas Tech's Rawls College of Business) and his team of cowriters and artists (Talya Bauer and Dave Ketchen) have set an amazingly high bar when it comes to rethinking the already amazing and growing potential of the graphic novel format. Atlas Black: Managing to Succeed is a witty, informative, and engaging graphic novel textbook that will hook just about any reader out there (seriously, check out their Amazon.com reviews). Short explains, “The famed media theorist Marshall McLuhan once said, ‘It’s misleading to suppose there’s any basic difference between education and entertainment. This distinction merely relieves people of the responsibility of looking into the matter.’ I think this quote applies well to our book. We’ve found that a much greater audience than business students have enjoyed these books.”

In February of 2009, GraphicNovelReporter published my Op Ed piece entitled “The Revolution will be Visualized…and Communicated.” Focused on the idea that we currently live during the greatest communication revolution of all time, this Op Ed emphasized how graphic novels are one of the most significant, emerging literary formats of our time.

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Jeremy Short (professor in Texas Tech's Rawls College of Business) and his team of cowriters and artists (Talya Bauer and Dave Ketchen) have set an amazingly high bar when it comes to rethinking the already amazing and growing potential of the graphic novel format. Atlas Black: Managing to Succeed is a witty, informative, and engaging graphic novel textbook that will hook just about any reader out there (seriously, check out their Amazon.com reviews). Short explains, “The famed media theorist Marshall McLuhan once said, ‘It’s misleading to suppose there’s any basic difference between education and entertainment. This distinction merely relieves people of the responsibility of looking into the matter.’ I think this quote applies well to our book. We’ve found that a much greater audience than business students have enjoyed these books.”

Read the rest of the story at Graphic Novel Reporter