Texas Tech Expert: Oil Spill Could Cause Population Problems for Endangered/Threatened Animals

Celine Godard-Codding, is keeping a close eye on endangered species and how they are affected by what has now been dubbed the largest oil spill in U.S. history.

Three dead sperm whales killed by the BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico could put the small population native to the gulf in peril, according to one Texas Tech University expert. Not only that, but endangered and threatened Kemp’s ridley and loggerhead sea turtles could face major population decimation as they breathe in toxic fumes and ingest crude oil, said Celine Godard-Codding, an assistant professor at The Institute of Environmental and Human Health at Texas Tech. Godard-Codding, is keeping a close eye on endangered species and how they are affected by what has now been dubbed the largest oil spill in U.S. history. She is working with the endangered and threatened sea turtles along the Texas coast to monitor how the animals will fare through the crisis. With more than 10 years of experience working with dolphin and whale toxicology, she also can discuss how oil impacts animals such as bottlenose dolphins and sperm whales. CONTACT: Celine Godard-Codding, assistant professor, The Institute of Environmental and Human Health, Texas Tech University, (806) 885-4567 or celine.godard@tiehh.ttu.edu.