War Correspondent, 'We Were Soldiers' Author to Visit Texas Tech

Joe Galloway co-authored the book “We Were Soldiers Once … and Young,” which was adapted into the movie “We Were Soldiers,” starring Mel Gibson.

Written by Cory Chandler

Joe Galloway

Galloway writes a weekly syndicated column on military and national security affairs.

Joe Galloway, a veteran journalist most famous for his combat reporting in Vietnam, will visit Texas Tech University to provide a pair of public lectures on campus Wednesday (Nov. 11).

Galloway co-authored the book “We Were Soldiers Once … and Young,” which was later adapted into the movie “We Were Soldiers,” starring Mel Gibson.

He will hold a 9:30 a.m. book signing at the Barnes and Noble in the Student Union Building.

He will then give a lecture at 3 p.m. in room 101 of the Mass Communications Building, discussing his experiences reporting wars on several continents.

A second lecture begins at 6:30 p.m. in the Senate Room of the Student Union Building.

Galloway is the only civilian awarded the U.S. Army’s Bronze Star for Valor during the Vietnam War. He later reported from the Persian Gulf, Iraq and Afghanistan, and recently retired as senior military correspondent of Knight-Ridder Newspapers.

He also writes a weekly syndicated column on military and national security affairs.

Southwest Collection/Special Collections Library

The Board of Regents of then-Texas Technological College formally established the Southwest Collection/Special Collections Library in 1955, but the librarys collection dates to the early years of Texas Tech.

The largest rare-book library in 130,000 square miles, the major historical repository and research center spans a 78,000-square-foot facility with climate-controlled stacks and pulls tens of thousands of individual items to answer research requests from all over the world. In total, the SWC/SCL houses 22 million historical items, including the master Coronelli globe, constructed in 1688 and once owned by William Randolph Hearst.

The SWC/SCL offers:

  • more than 1,600 manuscript collections
  • 80,000 volumes related to the region
  • 4,000 oral history interviews
  • nearly one million accessible photographs
  • 1,500 newspaper and periodical titles
  • 8,000 reels of microfilm and videotape
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