College of Outreach and Distance Education Names Director of External Relations

Dennis Michaelis will oversee Texas Tech’s partnership with McLennan Community College and help expand the university’s presence around the state.

Written by: Abby Tomlinson

Before coming to Texas Tech, Dennis Michaelis served as president for McLennan Community College for 21 years.

Before coming to Texas Tech, Dennis Michaelis served as president for McLennan Community College for 21 years.

Texas Tech University’s College of Outreach and Distance Education recently named Dennis Michaelis as director of external college and community relations. He will begin on September 1.

As director, Michaelis will oversee the McLennan Community College/Texas Tech University partnership in Waco. Michaelis also will develop and implement a strategic plan for expanding Texas Tech’s presence along the I-35 and I-45 corridors.

Dean of the College of Outreach and Distance Education Matt Baker said he is extremely pleased to have Michaelis join the college’s team.

“Dr. Michaelis has an outstanding track record when it comes to fostering and securing funding for program growth. This experience, in combination with his other exceptional professional and personal accomplishments, makes him the perfect candidate for this position,” Baker said. “I am excited to see the success that his expertise will undoubtedly bring to our college’s initiatives.”

Originally from Hill City, Kan., Michaelis earned a Bachelor of Science in Education from the University of Kansas and a Master of Arts in English from Fort Hays State University before earning a Doctorate in Higher Education Administration from Kansas State University.

Professionally, Michaelis served as president of Paris Junior College in Paris, Texas, and president of Lake Region Community College in Devils Lake, N.D. before he began his 21-year tenure at McLennan Community College (MCC) in 1988.

Under Michaelis’ leadership, MCC saw the greatest enrollment growth in the college’s history: a 55 percent increase from 5,500 students in 2000 to 8,543 in 2005.