Texas Tech Researcher Available to Discuss Climate Change, Projections

A prominent Texas Tech University climate researcher can discuss how global climate change will affect the United States during the coming century.

The report from the Global Humanitarian Forum warns that more than 300 million people are already seriously affected by the gradual warming of the earth and that number is set to double by 2030. A prominent Texas Tech University climate researcher can discuss how global climate change will affect the United States during the coming century. Also, she can discuss the current global warming legislation pending in Congress and how the choices made now will shape future patterns of climate change. Katharine Hayhoe, a research associate professor at the Department of Geosciences at Texas Tech, said that though global climate change is happening now, making immediate changes in the United States' current emissions can dramatically reduce the impacts we can expect down the road. By taking steps now to reduce emissions, the result will be much like the old adage: An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. Most recently, Hayhoe worked with the University of California, Berkeley, on a project that modeled how climate change would affect the global wildfire patterns. Also, she has led large research teams that have assessed the potential impacts of climate change on the Northeastern part of the U.S., the state of California and the city of Chicago's people, ecosystems, water resources and economy. Hayhoe served as a reviewer and contributor to the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's massive international analysis of the impact of human activities on Earth's climate. The IPCC was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 2007 together with former U.S. Vice President Al Gore. CONTACT: Katharine Hayhoe, associate professor, Department of Geosciences, Texas Tech University, (806) 392-1900, or katharine.hayhoe@ttu.edu