Field Day Showcases Turfgrass Research

The latest in Texas Tech University’s turfgrass research, as well as information on controlling pesky problems like sandburs and grubs, highlight the 2008 Turfgrass Field Day on Aug. 13 at the university’s Quaker Research Farm.

Written by Cory Chandler

The latest in Texas Tech University’s turfgrass research, as well as information on controlling pesky problems like sandburs and grubs, highlight the 2008 Turfgrass Field Day on Aug. 13 at the university’s Quaker Research Farm.

“This field day offers exciting educational opportunities for turfgrass professionals and interested home owners, especially when we’re facing such harsh environmental and low-water conditions,” said Gerald Henry, field day director and an assistant professor with Texas Tech’s Department of Plant and Soil Science. “We selected this date in order to provide the best opportunity to view the research plots when they are under the greatest summer stress.”

Registration begins at 8:15 a.m. and field tours begin an hour later, he said. Lunch will be served at noon. The field day is sponsored by Texas Tech, Smithco, Turfco, Andersons Golf Products, Progressive Mowers, Luber Bros. and Jacobsen.

Among the morning highlights are presentations featuring:

  • Zoysiagrass establishment from plugs with fertilizers, biostimulants, and cultural practices
  • Wildflowers for low maintenance landscaping
  • Field sandbur control with revolver and spray adjuvants
  • Buffalograss breeding/’Shadow Turf’ zoysiagrass shade tolerance and application
  • Herbicide tolerance and weed control options for buffalograss
  • ‘Roundup PROMAX,’ Monsanto’s new glyphosate for turf
  • Turfgrass nematodes and disease management in West Texas
  • Drought and salt tolerant tall fescue

Department of Plant and Soil Science speakers include Gerald Henry, Cynthia McKenney and Dick Auld. Jason Woodward with Texas A&M’s Department of Plant and Soil Science and Texas AgriLife Extension, and Luke Etheredge with the Monsanto Industrial, Turf and Ornamental Group also will be spotlighted.

Located at 200 N. Quaker Ave., the research farm has 120 acres of irrigated crop land used for evaluating characteristics and performance of various crops. In addition to turfgrass research, Texas Tech scientists conduct research on cotton and an assortment of other crops such as tomatoes, onions, guar, corn, peanuts and wildflowers. Caster, canola, soybean, mustard and safflower are researched on the farm because of their biodiesel capabilities.

Officials indicated that Texas Pesticide Certification and Golf Course Superintendents Association of America credits are available for field day participation.

CONTACT: Gerald Henry, assistant professor, Department of Plant and Soil Science, Texas Tech University, (806)742-2871 or gerald.henry@ttu.edu