Wetsel Featured Speaker for Texas Tech School of Law Energy Law Lecture Series

Roderick E. Wetsel is a partner with Wetsel, Carmichael & Allen, LLP and co-author of Texas Wind Law.

Roderick E. Wetsel

Roderick E. Wetsel

WHAT: The Texas Tech University School of Law will host Roderick E. Wetsel, Partner at Wetsel, Carmichael & Allen, LLP and co-author of the treatise Texas Wind Law, as part of its Energy Law Lecture Series.

WHEN: Noon Thursday (Nov. 9)

WHERE: Lanier Auditorium, Texas Tech School of Law, 1802 Hartford Ave.

EVENT: Roderick E. Wetsel, a partner at Wetsel, Carmichael & Allen, LLP and Co-Author of Texas Wind Law, will be the featured speaker for the next installment of the Texas Tech School of Law Energy Law Lecture Series. Wetsel will discuss “A Whirlwind Tour through the Exciting New World of Wind Energy.”

Wetsel has practiced law for 38 years. He is an adjunct professor at the University of Texas School of Law, where he teaches a seminar on Texas Wind Law in the spring and a wind law class with professor Ernest E. Smith in the fall.

In 2011, Wetsel co-authored the first treatise on Texas Wind Law with Smith, Steven K. DeWolf and Becky H. Diffen, which is published by LexisNexis and revised annually. Additionally, Wetsel has written numerous articles on wind energy as well as oil and gas law. He is a frequent speaker on wind energy issues throughout the U.S..

A live webcast of the lecture can be viewed online.

Those attending the event are eligible for one hour of Continuing Legal Education (CLE) credit. Contact Erica Lux at for details.

CONTACT: Ashley Langdon, assistant dean of alumni relations and communications, Texas Tech School of Law, Texas Tech University, (806) 834-7533 or


Find Texas Tech news, experts and story ideas at Texas Tech Today Media Resources or follow us on Twitter.


Texas Tech School of Law

The Texas Tech School of Law is a leader among Texas law schools with a 16-year average pass rate of 90 percent on the State Bar Exam.

A small student body, a diverse faculty and a low student-faculty ratio (15.3:1) promotes learning and encourages interaction between students and professors.

Twitter
Facebook