Phelim McAleer Featured Speaker for Energy Law Lecture Series

McAleer is an investigative journalist and filmmaker.

Phelim McAleer

Phelim McAleer

WHAT: The Texas Tech University School of Law will host Phelim McAleer, a filmmaker and investigative journalist, as part of its Terry Lee Grantham Memorial Energy Law Lecture Series.

WHEN: Noon Monday (March 20)

WHERE: Lanier Auditorium, Texas Tech University School of Law, 1802 Hartford Ave.

EVENTS: Phelim McAleer, a filmmaker and investigative journalist, will be the featured speaker for the Texas Tech School of Law’s Terry Lee Grantham Memorial Energy Law Lecture Series. He will speak on “A Journalist’s Search for the Fracking Truth.”

McAleer is the writer, director and producer of the documentaries “FrackNation, Not Evil Just Wrong” and “Mine Your Own Business.” A special screening of “FrackNation” will be held at 7 p.m. Sunday (March 19) at the Alamo Drafthouse, 120 W. Loop 289. Tickets are free, but seating is limited. Please RSVP for the film screening by emailing .

McAleer has produced documentaries for CBC (Canada) and RTE (Ireland). Before becoming a filmmaker, McAleer was a foreign correspondent for the Financial Times in Eastern Europe. He also covered Romania and Bulgaria for the Economist. Before that he covered Ireland for the UK Sunday Times.

He has worked as a filmmaker and journalist in many countries, including Romania, Uganda, Madagascar, Bulgaria, Chile, Indonesia, Canada and China. McAleer has appeared on or is a regular contributor to an array of international media organizations including Fox News, CNN and the BBC.

A live webcast of the lecture can be seen online.

CONTACT: Ashley Langdon, director of alumni relations, School of Law, Texas Tech University, (806) 834-7533 or


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Texas Tech School of Law

The Texas Tech School of Law is a leader among Texas law schools with a 16-year average pass rate of 90 percent on the State Bar Exam.

A small student body, a diverse faculty and a low student-faculty ratio (15.3:1) promotes learning and encourages interaction between students and professors.

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