School of Law Hosts United States Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals

The court will hear oral arguments in the Hunt Courtroom.


No Mobile Phones

Electronic devices are not permitted while in the courtroom gallery, including cameras and recording devices. Cell phones must be turned OFF, not muted or in airplane mode. There are no exceptions to these rules.

 


WHAT: The Texas Tech University School of Law will host the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit

WHEN: 9 a.m. Monday (April 3) through Thursday (April 6)

WHERE: Hunt Courtroom, Texas Tech University School of Law, 1802 Hartford Ave.<

EVENT: The United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit will hear oral arguments at Texas Tech University’s School of Law Monday through Thursday (April 3-6). U.S. Circuit Judges Jerry E. Smith, Jennifer Walker Elrod and Catharina Haynes, and U.S. District Judge Robert A. Junell, sitting by designation, will hear oral arguments in panels of three.

The proceedings are open to the public.

Oral arguments begin at 9 a.m. each morning and are expected to last 1-2 hours each day, so guests are encouraged to arrive early. Those in attendance may not congregate outside the courtroom entrance and are encouraged to enter and leave the courtroom quietly during oral arguments as needed, especially for class attendance.

Observers should be seated if seating is available and otherwise may stand in the back of the courtroom. Backpacks will be permitted. There is no dress code other than refraining from wearing expressive clothing.

CONTACT: Ashley Langdon, director of alumni relations, School of Law, Texas Tech University, (806) 834-7533 or ashley.langdon@ttu.edu


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Texas Tech School of Law

The Texas Tech School of Law is a leader among Texas law schools with a 16-year average pass rate of 90 percent on the State Bar Exam.

A small student body, a diverse faculty and a low student-faculty ratio (15.3:1) promotes learning and encourages interaction between students and professors.

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