Bernard Weinstein Featured Speaker for Energy Law Lecture Series

Weinstein is the associate director for the Maguire Energy Institute, which encourages the study of management, marketing and policy issues related to the energy industry.

Weinstein

Bernard Weinstein

WHAT: The Texas Tech University School of Law will host Bernard L. Weinstein, Maguire Energy Institute associate director, as part of its Energy Law Lecture Series.

WHEN: Noon Monday (Feb. 13)

WHERE: Lanier Auditorium, Texas Tech University School of Law, 1802 Hartford Ave.

EVENT: Bernard L. Weinstein, associate director of the Southern Methodist University Maguire Energy Institute in Dallas, will be the featured speaker for the first installment of the spring Texas Tech School of Law Energy Law Lecture Series.

Weinstein studied public administration at Dartmouth College and received his bachelor's degree in 1963. After a year of study at the London School of Economics and Political Science, he began graduate work in economics at Columbia University, receiving a master's degree in 1966 and a doctorate in 1973.

He has taught at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, the State University of New York, the University of Texas at Dallas, and the University of North Texas. He has been a research associate with the Tax Foundation in Washington, D.C., and the Gray Institute in Beaumont. He has worked for several U.S. government agencies including the President's Commission on School Finance, the Internal Revenue Service and the Federal Trade Commission.

A live webcast of the lecture can be seen here.

Those attending the event are eligible for one hour of Continuing Legal Education (CLE) credit. Contact Erica Lux at erica.lux@ttu.edu for details.


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Texas Tech School of Law

The Texas Tech School of Law is a leader among Texas law schools with a 16-year average pass rate of 90 percent on the State Bar Exam.

A small student body, a diverse faculty and a low student-faculty ratio (15.3:1) promotes learning and encourages interaction between students and professors.

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