School of Law Hosts 7th Court of Appeals

The court will hear cases brought from appeal from the state’s lower courts.

WHAT: The Texas Tech University School of Law will host the 7th Court of Appeals, which will hold oral arguments in the Hunt Courtroom.

WHEN: 10 a.m. Monday (Oct. 3)

WHERE: Donald M. Hunt Courtroom, School of Law, 1802 Hartford Ave.

EVENT: Texas Tech School of Law students and the general public will have an opportunity to view the 7th Court of Appeals, which usually presides in Amarillo, in action. The court, which consists of Chief Justice Brian Quinn and justices James T. Campbell, Mackey K. Hancock and Patrick A. Pirtle, has immediate appellate jurisdiction of civil and criminal cases appealed from lower courts in 46 Texas counties.

Chief Justice Quinn ('81) and justices Hancock ('74) and Pirtle ('77) earned their juris doctorates from the Texas Tech School of Law. Justices Campbell, Hancock and Pirtle earned their bachelor's degrees from Texas Tech.

Several Texas Tech Law School alumni will be arguing the cases before the court – Mark W. McBrayer ('02) and W.C. Bratcher ('75) with Crenshaw, Dupree & Milam; Audie M. Reese, attorney and counselor at law ('10); Lauren Murphree ('13) with the Lubbock County District Attorney's office; Linda Russell ('04) with Hund, Krier, Wilkerson & Wright; and Charles Dunn ('80), a lawyer in Lubbock.

Oral arguments will be heard in four cases over two sessions on Monday, the first session beginning at 10 a.m. and the second at 1:30 p.m. Three cases arise out of Lubbock County and the fourth from Bailey County.

This is the fifth straight year for the 7th Court of Appeals to hear cases at the Texas Tech School of Law.

CONTACT: Sarah Salazar, director of communications, School of Law, Texas Tech University, (806) 834-5074 or sarah.e.salazar@ttu.edu


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Texas Tech School of Law

The Texas Tech School of Law is a leader among Texas law schools with a 16-year average pass rate of 90 percent on the State Bar Exam.

A small student body, a diverse faculty and a low student-faculty ratio (15.3:1) promotes learning and encourages interaction between students and professors.

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