Why Your Aches and Pains May be Linked to Houston's Big Storms

Texas Standard - In places like Richmond on the Brazos River, some residents had to use kayaks to get around as floodwaters last week forced thousands to evacuate, including Mary Doetterl.

People who study the weather's effect on us are called biometeorologists. They say there could be more to come: more allergy outbreaks because of more mold and mildew and more illness from mosquitoes that thrive in wet weather.
"Biggest issues would be mold and mosquitoes in terms of health effects," says Jennifer Vanos, professor of Atmospheric Science at Texas Tech University.

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