Center for Water Law and Policy Presents Documentary Screening

“Written on Water” traces the struggle to sustain water resources in West Texas.

WHAT: Screening of documentary "Written on Water" at the inaugural Water & Film Symposium

WHEN: 7 p.m. Thursday (Feb. 4)

WHERE: Alamo Drafthouse Cinema, 120 West Loop 289

EVENT: Presented by the Center for Water Law and Policy at Texas Tech University's School of Law, "Written on Water" focuses on the Ogallala Aquifer and examines the conflicts, politics, economics and scarcity of groundwater in West Texas. The film follows farmers and residents of a small town struggling to survive as the water source dwindles and highlights tension between property rights advocates and farmer-conservationists.

Directed by former United States Geological Survey geologist Merri Lisa Trigilio, the film is the inaugural event for the Water & Film Symposium, which features a Q&A panel with nationally acclaimed groundwater scientists and water policy experts. The panelists include Jay Famiglietti, a senior water cycle specialist and project scientist for the Western States Water Mission; Michael Campana, technical director for the American Water Resources Association and professor at Oregon State University; and Sharlene Leurig, director of the Sustainable Water Infrastructure Program at Ceres, a national nonprofit helping institutional investors integrate sustainability into capital markets.

Admission to the screening is free and open to the public. RSVPs to Erica Lux, erica.lux@ttu.edu or (806) 834-3412, are appreciated but not required.

CONTACT: Alex Pearl, assistant professor and director, Center for Water Law and Policy, School of Law, Texas Tech University, (806) 834-6865 or alex.pearl@ttu.edu


Texas Tech School of Law

The Texas Tech School of Law is a leader among Texas law schools with a 16-year average pass rate of 90 percent on the State Bar Exam.

A small student body, a diverse faculty and a low student-faculty ratio (15.3:1) promotes learning and encourages interaction between students and professors.

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