Law Professor Velte to Lecture on Ramifications from Marriage Equality Decision

The lecture will examine the impact going forward on the lives of LGBT individuals.

WHAT:           Texas Tech University presents a lecture, “Ramifications of Obergefell vs. Hodges: Same-Sex Marriage in America”

WHEN:           Noon Tuesday (Oct. 20); encore presentation at 7 p.m.

WHERE:         Lanier Auditorium, Texas Tech School of Law, 1802 Hartford Ave.
                       
EVENT:          Kyle Velte, a visiting assistant professor at the Texas Tech School of Law, will present a lecture examining the possible wide-ranging legal ramifications and protections for LGBT people from this summer’s U.S. Supreme Court decision in Obergefell vs. Hodges, which legalized same-sex marriage.

Velte, who prior to joining Texas Tech was an assistant professor of practice in the Legal Externship Program at the University of Denver, has expertise in civil procedure, conflicts of law, and sexual orientation and the law.

In its current form, Velte argues, the ruling will have only a limited impact on the lives of LGBT individuals beyond marriage and the doctrinal reach beyond marriage for the law is short, if any at all. She argues Obergefell does not compel protection from sexual orientation discrimination in areas such as employment, housing and public accommodation.

The lecture is open to the public and admission is free. Those attending the event are eligible for one hour of Continuing Legal Education (CLE) credit.

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CONTACT:Kari Abitbol, director of communications, Texas Tech School of Law, (806) 834-8591 or kari.abitbol@ttu.edu.


Texas Tech School of Law

The Texas Tech School of Law is a leader among Texas law schools with a 16-year average pass rate of 90 percent on the State Bar Exam.

A small student body, a diverse faculty and a low student-faculty ratio (15.3:1) promotes learning and encourages interaction between students and professors.

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