Texas Tech University School of Law Announcing Public Service Graduation Requirement

Texas Supreme Court Justice Eva Guzman will be among the featured speakers for the event.

WHAT:           The Texas Tech University School of Law will announce new public service requirements beginning with the Fall 2015 semester at a news conference. 

WHEN:           10 a.m. Monday (Aug. 31)

WHERE:         Hunt Courtroom, Texas Tech School of Law, 1802 Hartford Ave.

EVENT:          New J.D. students entering the Texas Tech School of Law in or after Fall 2015 must complete at least 30 hours of public service before graduation. At least 15 of those hours must be in the form of pro bono legal services, with the remaining 15 hours consisting of either pro bono legal service or non-legal community service.

Also, all full-time faculty will be required to perform at least 10 hours of public service each year.

Texas Supreme Court Justice Eva Guzman, who is a staunch supporter of legal assistance programs for the poor and serves as the Court’s liaison to the Texas Access to Justice Foundation and the Texas Access to Justice Commission, will be available to speak about the law school’s new initiative.

Texas Tech law school dean Darby Dickerson also will be available to the media. Those requesting one-on-one interviews after the news conference should contact the law school.

At noon, Guzman will speak in the Lanier Auditorium as the featured speaker for the Academy for Leadership in the Legal Profession, which provides students the tools necessary to lead in the legal profession, business and the community.

The news conference will be streamed live at the internet at this website.

Find Texas Tech news, experts and story ideas at Texas Tech Today Media Resources or follow us on Twitter.

CONTACT:Kari Abitbol, director of communications, Texas Tech School of Law,
(806) 834-8591 or kari.abitbol@ttu.edu.


Texas Tech School of Law

The Texas Tech School of Law is a leader among Texas law schools with a 16-year average pass rate of 90 percent on the State Bar Exam.

A small student body, a diverse faculty and a low student-faculty ratio (15.3:1) promotes learning and encourages interaction between students and professors.

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