Texas Tech Student Tabbed as New Face of Engineering

Kelli Alvarado was recognized by DiscoverE for her work in petroleum engineering.

Kelli Alvarado

Kelli Alvarado

Kelli Alvarado, a fourth-year petroleum engineering major from Odessa, was named as one of the nation's 12 up-and-coming engineering professionals in DiscoverE's fourth annual New Faces of Engineering, College Edition.

Alvarado has been influential both at Texas Tech University and in the petroleum engineering field. She was nominated for the honor by the Society of Petroleum Engineers (SPE).

“I am very honored to have received this prestigious award and be able to represent the Texas Tech College of Engineering,” Alvarado said. “Throughout my collegiate career, the Engineering Opportunities Center has helped me in so many different ways to learn and grow as an engineer. I would like to thank the EOC and Petroleum Engineering chairman Marshall Watson for recommending me to apply and now to achieve such a high honor. Texas Tech has provided me with such a positive platform and I am eager to see what the future holds. I'm so lucky to call myself a Red Raider.”

The New Faces of Engineering recognizes students who display the vision, innovation and leadership skills necessary to build the foundation for a successful career in engineering.

Students honored also display excellence in the classroom, leadership in student organizations, outstanding communications skills and community service in non-engineering related fields.

“We are proud to recognize the accomplishments of these exemplary college engineering students,” said Leslie Collins, executive director of DiscoverE, which promotes engineering at the secondary education level. “They are tomorrow's leaders and we are excited to see where their knowledge, creativity and ingenuity will lead them, and us, in the years ahead.”

In her time at the Department of Petroleum Engineering at Texas Tech, Alvarado helped start Ladies in Petroleum (LIP) to feature women in what has traditionally been a male-dominated field. LIP gives female juniors and seniors in petroleum engineering a perspective of the work environment and what to expect after graduation.

Alvarado also has hands-on experience in the field, having interned for Anadarko Petroleum and Pioneer Natural Resources. In her internship, she installed plunger lifts that optimized production and the amount of oil that can be retrieved from the ground.

“Kelli is a true representative of the entrepreneurial spirit that so many of our female engineering students embody,” said Jamie Perez, assistant director of the Engineering Opportunities Center. “Her leadership and mentorship of younger female engineering students is already boosting confidence and building a community of empowered women at Texas Tech who are entering industries that are traditionally male-dominated.”


Whitacre College of Engineering

The Edward E. Whitacre Jr. College of Engineering has educated engineers to meet the technological needs of Texas, the nation and the world since 1925.

Approximately 4,300 undergraduate and 725 graduate students pursue bachelors, masters and doctoral degrees offered through eight academic departments: civil and environmental, chemical, computer science, electrical and computer, engineering technology, industrial, mechanical and petroleum.

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