New Micro-Device Could Change Drug Testing

Texas Tech researchers' creation is a device that could replace the current drug screening systems.

Vanapalli and his team created a simple microfluidic device about the size of a penny that could potentially make drug testing faster and less expensive.

Vanapalli and his team created a simple microfluidic device about the size of a penny that could potentially make drug testing faster and less expensive.

Texas Tech scientists have filed for a patent on a new device that could make some drug testing faster and less expensive.

Siva Vanapalli, an assistant professor in Texas Tech’s Department of Chemical Engineering, and his team created a simple microfluidic device about the size of a penny that could replace the current drug screening systems. Vanapalli’s work was recently featured in the journal Lab on a Chip.

“To develop a drug one must develop not only the drug compound, but also determine how much of the drug to give for it to be effective,” Vanapalli said.

Vanapalli is currently working with anti-bacterial chemicals, but hopes the process can be refined to aid in screening for new anti-cancer drugs.

The pharmaceutical industry screens hundreds of thousands of drug candidates each year using large robots that deliver one specific concentration of the drug at a time, a time-consuming process that requires large amounts of the compound and reagents.

“Our chip changes the process in two ways,” he said. “We can do multiple concentrations of the drug at one time. That means we can use a sample maybe 1,000 times smaller than the amount currently used and we can do the same work in a much shorter time period. In short, making the drug screening process faster and more inexpensive for the pharmaceutical company and hopefully reducing the ultimate cost to the consumer.”

The device looks like a computer chip with microchannels and nanoliter-wells to hold several droplets, testing multiple concentrations of the drug at the same time.

The device looks like a computer chip with microchannels and nanoliter-wells to hold several droplets, testing multiple concentrations of the drug at the same time.

Vanapalli’s lab has demonstrated testing 60 different concentrations of a drug in about 10 minutes and expects to be able to improve on those numbers in future devices.

The new device looks like a computer chip with multiple microchannels and nanoliter wells to hold an array of droplets of a substance. A scientist can vary the presence of other materials from drop to drop, thus testing multiple concentrations of the drug at the same time.

The use of microfluidic droplet arrays for drug testing was actually an accident.

“We were working on a different type of experiment, but the outcome led us down this path,” Vanapalli said. “It is incidents like this that make science exciting.”

Vanapalli’s research is supported in part by the National Science Foundation and the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas.


Whitacre College of Engineering

The Edward E. Whitacre Jr. College of Engineering has educated engineers to meet the technological needs of Texas, the nation and the world since 1925.

Approximately 4,300 undergraduate and 725 graduate students pursue bachelors, masters and doctoral degrees offered through eight academic departments: civil and environmental, chemical, computer science, electrical and computer, engineering technology, industrial, mechanical and petroleum.

Twitter
Facebook
YouTube [tttboilerplates id=99]

Related

Law Moot Court Team Wins Award, Advances to Semifinals

Researcher to Lecture on Roman Cartography

New English Language Center to Open This Summer