Expert: Agriculture a Useless Degree? That is Hardly the Case

Whether it’s increasing productivity for growing food, or conservation of natural resources, or discovering new and better products through genomics and biotechnology, career opportunities for agriculture professionals often exceed the number of qualified graduates currently in the pipeline.

Pitch

Whether it’s increasing productivity for growing food, or conservation of natural resources, or discovering new and better products through genomics and biotechnology, career opportunities for agriculture professionals often exceed the number of qualified graduates currently in the pipeline.

 

Expert

Sukant Misra, associate dean for research, College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources, (806) 742-2808 or sukant.misra@ttu.edu

 

Talking Points


  • Agriculture students will also take on larger leadership roles in government and industry, where professionals with agricultural knowledge will be needed to address science, policy and regulatory questions.
  • Experts are predicting that the world’s population is likely to grow by 50 percent from 6 billion to 9 billion. Somehow agriculturists have to figure out how to double our food production while using the same or less land, water and energy. That will be possible if, and only if, the public, academic institutions and governments give renewed attention to agricultural development and to strengthening the national agricultural research systems.
  • Texas is, unequivocally, a leader in our nation’s agriculture, contributing more than $100 billion to the state’s economy each year.
  • Texas Tech has the second largest undergraduate student enrollment in the country for non-land grant agricultural and natural resources programs.

 

References


Click here to read an op-ed Misra recently wrote about this subject.