Experts: 53 Years Later Buddy Holly’s Influence is Alive and Well

The music may have died in an Iowa cornfield Feb. 3, 1959, but Buddy Holly’s impact on music still raves on today.

Pitch

The music may have died in an Iowa cornfield Feb. 3, 1959, but Buddy Holly’s impact on music still raves on today.

The 22 year-old legend set the template for the rock ‘n’ roll standard: two guitars, bass and drums. He was also one of the first to write, produce and perform his own songs.

 

Experts

  • Wes Cochran, Maddox Professor of Law, (806) 742-3990 ext. 234 or wesley.cochran@ttu.edu.
  • Christopher Smith, chairman of Musicology/Ethnomusicology and director of the Vernacular Music Center, (806) 438-5067, christopher.smith@ttu.edu.
  • Rob Weiner, associate librarian and pop culture expert, (806) 742-2238 ext. 282, or rob.weiner@ttu.edu.

 

Talking Points

  • How Holly’s handling of copyright and recording contracts changed the music industry – Wes Cochran
  • Artists influenced by Buddy Holly, including The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, Bob Dylan and Elton John. – Christopher Smith
  • Songs that pay homage to Holly, including the one that coined the phrase “the Day the Music Died” from “American Pie” by Don McLean. – Rob Weiner

Quotes

  • “Holly along with Norman Petty produced some of the most clean sounding music of the 1950s. The fact that the Beatles chose their name after Holly’s group the Crickets is very telling.” – Rob Weiner
  • “Buddy Holly had his own vision, his own sound, and when he insisted on producing his own music, he was laughed at. No one did that back then. But he took control of the business side, so that he could control the creative side.” – Wes Cochran
  • “Holly had apparently planned to come back to Lubbock and start a music studio for other aspiring musicians. Who knows what could have happened?” – Rob Weiner