Thanks to music archive, show will go on

Houston Chronicle-Wilkinson and his Texas Tech University colleague Curtis Peoples traveled from Lubbock to Corpus Christi to hear Martinez’s stories. Their goal: to save stories like his for scholars, researchers and music lovers to enjoy for generations.

For Oscar Martinez, the show must go on.

Sitting in a Suburban bound for a Victoria gig in 1964, the 30 year-old trumpet player knew his band’s reputation was on the line. Their lead singer had canceled at the last minute, but Martinez had a plan.

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Wilkinson and his Texas Tech University colleague Curtis Peoples traveled from Lubbock to Corpus Christi to hear Martinez’s stories. Their goal: to save stories like his for scholars, researchers and music lovers to enjoy for generations.

"There’s nothing like having a person speaking in their own words for people to listen to 100 years from now," said Wilkinson, artist in residence with the Crossroads Music Archive.

The music archive, part of Texas Tech University’s Southwest Collection, is an ongoing project containing stories, recordings and a range of memorabilia documenting the history, influences and evolution of music of the Southwest. Music ranging from rock ‘n’ roll to opera can be found in the archive and in the history of the Southwest.

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