Texas Tech and Petroleum Engineering are All in the Family

Third-generation Texas Tech petroleum engineer to follow in family's footsteps.

Written by Audrey Rickel

Taylor said growing up he went to all the football games, and his family is all about Texas Tech.

Taylor said growing up he went to all the football games, and his family is all about Texas Tech.

Some might say Texas Tech and petroleum engineering are in Taylor Billingsley's blood.

Both his father and grandfather graduated from Texas Tech with petroleum engineering degrees, and he is about to follow in their footsteps, graduating this week.

Born and raised in Midland, Billingsley said he grew up around petroleum engineers and oil rigs his entire life.

"I remember so many times my dad would take me out to a rig to see close-up, which not everyone gets to do," Billingsley said. "He would show me everything and explain it all to me, and I guess that's what got me really interested."

Billingsley originally went to Texas A&M and later decided to transfer to Texas Tech after receiving a partial scholarship and a little shameless persuasion from his father.

"My family members are huge Tech supporters," Billingsley said. "Growing up we went to all the football games, and we were all about Texas Tech."

Hall graduated from Texas Tech in 1959, and after spending time in the Navy, worked as a petroleum engineer for 45 years.

Hall graduated from Texas Tech in 1959, and after spending time in the Navy, worked as a petroleum engineer for 45 years.

Petroleum Engineering is a Family Tradition

Taylor's father, Cary Billingsley, graduated from Texas Tech in 1978 with a petroleum engineering degree.

Cary Billingsley said all the petroleum engineers in their family have worked in different areas, and they enjoy discussing the oilfield and the myriad of challenges and concerns facing the petroleum industry, along with solutions and accomplishments they have seen.

"I graduated high school during the time of the Arab oil embargo, and I also grew up surrounded by the oilfield," Cary Billingsley said. "I have a very genuine interest in the petroleum industry and trying to help solve the world's energy problems."

Gary Hall, Taylor Billingsley's grandfather, grew up in Midland and was the first person in his family to attend college. He graduated from Texas Tech in 1959, and after spending time in the Navy, worked as a petroleum engineer for 45 years.

"Growing up in Midland, I saw the importance of the petroleum industry," Hall said. "Texas Tech had a good reputation and was close to home, and I thought petroleum engineering would be a good major to consider."

Hall said Texas Tech has had a positive impact on his life, his families' lives and his career.

"My association with Texas Tech has impacted virtually every area of my life," Cary Billingsley said. "Because of this association, I have a readymade family, not only with my immediate family, but also an extended Red Raider family that I call my own."

Cary Billingsley said he is honored to have Taylor follow in their family tradition, graduating from Texas Tech with a petroleum engineering degree.

"Taylor could not have selected a better quality university or a better degree in my opinion," Cary Billingsley said.

Whitacre College of Engineering

The Edward E. Whitacre Jr. College of Engineering

The Edward E. Whitacre Jr. College of Engineering has educated engineers to meet the technological needs of Texas, the nation and the world since 1925.

Approximately 4,300 undergraduate and 725 graduate students pursue bachelors, masters and doctoral degrees offered through eight academic departments: civil and environmental, chemical, computer science, electrical and computer, engineering technology, industrial, mechanical and petroleum.

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