Professor Receives Lifetime Achievement Award

Eta Sigma Phi recently awarded Edward V. George the 2011 ESP Lifetime Achievement Award.

Written by Kate Lepard

Some of George's most notable work involves educating teachers on how to use Latin as a bridge to Spanish.

Some of George's most notable work involves educating teachers on how to use Latin as a bridge to Spanish.

Eta Sigma Phi (ESP), the National Classics Honor Society, recently awarded Edward V. George, professor of classics emeritus, the 2011 ESP Lifetime Achievement Award for the Promotion of the Classics.

George was one of two recipients who received this honor at ESP’s annual national convention at the University of Texas at Austin.

“To the College of Arts and Sciences, the Department of Classical and Modern Languages, and especially to the people in classics who were with me as colleagues, I am grateful for providing a stable, supportive environment for well over three decades,” George said. “Let’s celebrate together.”

George, a Texas Tech professor since 1971, spent the last 40 years participating in activities which qualified him for this honor. Some of George’s most notable work involves educating teachers on how to use Latin as a bridge to Spanish.

He also was honored for his research in Neo-Latin, the body of Latin used from the Renaissance onward. He also co-edited, “Columbus’ First Voyage,” a Latin text that exemplifies the value of Neo-Latin as a source of documents on early European exploration of America.  

In addition to his research and writings, George has served as president of the American Association for Neo-Latin Studies, president of the Texas Classical Association and vice president of the American Classical League, a national organization which links college and high school Latin and Classics teachers.

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College of
Arts & Sciences

The Texas Tech University College of Arts & Sciences was founded in 1925 as one of the university’s four original colleges. 

Comprised of 15 departments, the College offers a wide variety of courses and programs in the humanities, social and behavioral sciences, mathematics and natural sciences. Students can choose from 41 bachelor’s degree programs, 34 master’s degrees and 14 doctoral programs.

With over 10,000 students (8,500 undergraduate and 1,200 graduate) enrolled, the College of Arts & Sciences is the largest college on the Texas Tech University campus.

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