IBHS Issues Preliminary Damage Report From Hurricane Ike: Roof Coverings Were the Number One Point of Concern in this Storm

ss & Home Safety (IBHS) today released its preliminary report from a survey of the damage caused by Hurricane Ike. IBHS Chief Engineer Dr. Tim Reinhold and researchers from the University of Florida, Texas Tech University, Florida International University, Louisiana State University and Clemson University spent two days surveying property damage in Galveston, Houston and the surrounding areas. 'Th

Released : Tuesday, September 16, 2008 2:27 PM

TAMPA, Fla., Sept. 16/PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The Institute for Business & Home Safety (IBHS) today released its preliminary report from a survey of the damage caused by Hurricane Ike.

 

IBHS Chief Engineer Dr. Tim Reinhold and researchers from the University of Florida, Texas Tech University, Florida International University, Louisiana State University and Clemson University spent two days surveying property damage in Galveston, Houston and the surrounding areas.

 

"The damage we have seen from Hurricane Ike drives home the need to establish clear definitions and standards for secondary water protection to achieve the kind of performance we need to keep water out of homes when these storms occur," said Dr. Reinhold. Secondary water protection is the moisture barrier between the roof deck and roof covering.

 

According to IBHS, although Ike contained a large amount of energy, the storm spread moderately strong winds over a large geographic area rather than very strong winds over a small area. Equipment from the University of Florida and Texas Tech University recorded wind gusts of 116-mph in rural areas about 50 miles northeast of Houston, but lower wind speeds closer to the metropolitan areas. Preliminary observations include:

 

Raywood

-- Damage to roof sheathing and siding were more prevalent. This type of

damage is consistent with what is expected in Category 2 hurricane

conditions.

-- A large number of multi-story homes and commercial buildings only put

window protection on the first floors, leaving upper stories vulnerable

to flying debris.

-- There was a significant amount of damage to commercial roofs.

 

 

Houston

-- Damage primarily involved roof coverings rather than sheathing (roof

deck), which is consistent with expectations for Category 1 hurricane

conditions.

-- Newer shingle roofs, tile roofs and metal roofs performed well. Older

shingle roofs sustained some damage in terms of lost shingles and

underlayment.

-- Generally, downtown Houston looked similar to what was seen in Fort

Lauderdale and Miami following Hurricane Wilma in 2005, although the

overall extent of damage appears less.

 

 

Galveston

-- Storm surge was the major cause of damage.

-- Older buildings built below current flood elevation requirements

suffered the most damage. Buildings that were not elevated experienced

major storm surge damage on lower levels and damage to roof coverings.

-- Newer buildings that were properly elevated according to modern building

codes performed well.

 

 

"What we have seen in terms of wind damage from Hurricanes Gustav and Ike reinforces the IBHS decision to focus on roofing failures during the first two years of investigation at the Insurance Center for Building Safety Research," Dr. Reinhold said. "Roof coverings were the number one point of concern in this storm."

This week, IBHS and university researchers will review supplementary data and information, including aerial photographs, in an effort to determine the impact that different variables had on the roof-covering damage that has been observed.

 

Continue to check the IBHS Web site www.DisasterSafety.org for damage photographs and additional research information as it becomes available.

 

 

IBHS is an independent, nonprofit, scientific and educational organization supported by the property insurance industry. The organization works to reduce the social and economic effects of natural disasters and other risks to residential and commercial property by conducting research and advocating improved construction, maintenance and preparation practices.

 

Available Topic Expert(s): For information on the listed expert(s), click

appropriate link.

Timothy Reinhold, PhD

https://profnet.prnewswire.com/Subscriber/ExpertProfile.aspx?ei=70954

 

 

SOURCE Institute for Business & Home Safety

CONTACT: Wendy Rose of the Institute for Business & Home Safety, +1-813-675-1045, wrose@ibhs.org

Copyright 2008 PR Newswire

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