TTU Home Communications & Marketing Home Texas Tech Today

Student-Run Sportscast Picked up by Fox Sports

Double T Insider will broadcast on Fox College Sports and Fox Sports Southwest.

Written by George Watson

The Double T Insider, a student-run sportscast produced in a partnership between the Texas Tech University College of Media & Communication and the athletic department, will air this season on both Fox College Sports and Fox Sports Southwest, the college announced Tuesday.

“This program will provide media and communication students with real-world production experience while informing Red Raider nation about the achievements of our student-athletes,” said David Hougland, Texas Tech director of broadcast services.

The Double T Insider airs weekly recapping news and features on Texas Tech athletics. It is entirely directed, filmed and edited by students in the College of Media & Communication in partnership with Texas Tech athletics and has been recognized as an award-winning production. In its first season in 2012, the show was nominated as one of the top six college sports television shows by the College Sports Media Awards.

The program allows students to earn valuable real-world experience in preparation for entering the workforce after graduation.

“At some schools, you don’t get to start doing anything until your junior or senior year,” said Blake Silverthorn, director and student manager of The Double T Insider. “By the time students are sophomores or juniors, they have enough experience to mentor the new DTI members.”

The show began as a weekly feature on YouTube before being broadcast in the Lubbock, Amarillo and Midland television markets. It will now be broadcast exclusively on the Fox Sports affiliates, which will further expand the university’s athletic reach.

“We stand to gain a much larger audience, especially in areas like Dallas-Fort Worth, where our alumni base is huge,” said Josh Robinson, media production manager for the College of Media & Communication. “With Fox Sports Southwest, we can get into the Dallas market, the Austin market and the Houston market.”

Fox Sports Southwest covers the entire state of Texas, from professional athletics to high schools. Fox College Sports concentrates entirely on collegiate athletics in three zones – Atlantic, Central and Pacific. The channels are available to most cable and satellite television subscribers.

“We want the transition of our students from the classroom to the workplace to be as seamless as possible,” said David Perlmutter, dean of the College of Media & Communication. “We know getting creative professional experience while at Texas Tech is crucial to their future. The Texas Tech sports-DTI partnership is a model of what our majors can achieve.”

FacebookTwitterLinkedInGoogle GmailTumblrGoogle+RedditShare


3 Responses to “Student-Run Sportscast Picked up by Fox Sports”

  1. Tell me I can’t do something | JEM Notes Says:

    […] started with a single Journalism & Electronic Media student three years ago has evolved into a weekly television show that will be aired on Fox College Sports and Fox Sports Southwest.  This is a big step for Double T Insider and BIG opportunity for students in JEM and the College […]

  2. Tod Robberson Says:

    I am so amazed at how far the college, and especially the student journalism program, have come in the nearly three decades since my graduation. This is a truly remarkable achievement. Students and faculty should be proud.

  3. P.L.Crossley Says:

    Do you know yet the time schedule in the Houston Market?

Leave a Reply

College of Media & Communication
College of Media & Communication

College of Media & Communication at Texas Tech offers undergraduate degrees in various communications-related disciplines including:

The College also offers graduate degrees in communications to prepare students for careers in the communications industry, communications research and academia. Connect with them on and

.
Related

Where Have All the Wheelchairs Gone?

Advertising Team Places Third at National Competition

Research Reveals Why Certain Slogans Work, Others Don't