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Alumni Honored During Ninth Annual Law School Gala

More than 300 guests, including local attorneys and judges, students, faculty and staff attended.

Written by Cory Chandler

From left to right, Kevin Glasheen, Sue Walker, William Dawson and School of Law Dean Darby Dickinson

From left to right, Kevin Glasheen, Sue Walker, William Dawson and School of Law Dean Darby Dickerson.

Texas Tech University School of Law celebrated its Ninth Annual Law School Gala March 1.

William Dawson (’75) and The Honorable Sue Walker (’86) received Distinguished Alumni Awards. Kevin Glasheen (’88) received the Distinguished Service Award.

The awards recognize professional and personal commitment to excellence, and contributions to the law school and legal community. More than three hundred guests, including local attorneys and judges, students, faculty and staff, attended this year’s event.



William Dawson

Dawson is a partner in the Dallas office of Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher, where he provides high-profile representation of accounting firms in professional liability disputes, leads trial teams in patent infringement and technology licensing disputes around the country.  He has experience in energy industry lawsuits, white-collar criminal matters and securities litigation.

Dawson received a Bachelor of Business Administration from Texas Tech University before graduating with highest honors from the law school.

Dawson was named Best Lawyers’ Lawyer of the Year for Bet-the-Company Litigation – Dallas in 2011, and has been included in The Best Lawyers in America® for Bet-the-Company and Commercial Litigation from 2003-2013.  He has been named one of seven Leading Individuals in Texas Dispute Resolution by Practical Law Company’s Which lawyer? Yearbook, was recognized as a Super Lawyer from 2003-2012 and named a Local Litigation Star in Texas for IP, Securities Litigation, Energy Law and Professional Liability by Euromoney’s Benchmark Litigation.  He was also named to the International Who’s Who of Business Lawyers in commercial litigation in 2006 and 2008.

He is a fellow in the American College of Trial Lawyers and the International Academy of Trial Lawyers.  He is an active member in the American Law Institute, currently serving as an adviser on the Restatement of the Law Third Torts: Liability for Economic Harm.  He is a member of the Fifth Circuit Bar Association and of the Board of Trustees for The Center for American and International Law. He is past-chair of the Science and Technology in the Courts Committee of the American College of Trial Lawyers.

Sue Walker

Walker was elected to serve on the Second Court of Appeals in 2001. Before her judicial service, Walker was a solo practitioner in civil and criminal appellate law. She is a former adjunct professor of law at Texas Wesleyan School of Law where she taught criminal appellate procedure. In her early legal career, Walker served as a briefing attorney and a staff attorney at the Fifth District Court of Appeals.

Walker attended Texas Tech Law after graduating with high honors from the University of Texas in Austin.

In 2012, the Texas Chapters of the American Board of Trial Advocates honored Walker by selecting her Jurist of the Year. Walker was also named the 2010 Judge Charles J. Murray Outstanding Jurist. She served on the Texas Supreme Court Task Force to Ensure Judicial Readiness in Times of Emergency. She has served as president, counselor and treasurer of the Eldon B. Mahon Inn of Court. In 2009 the Eldon B. Mahon Inn of Court elected her to the Serjeant’s Inn of the Dallas and Fort Worth Inns of Court. Walker is also a fellow of the Advanced Science & Technology Resource Center in Washington, D.C, and the Texas Bar Foundation.

Walker is a member of the American Law Institute. She served as second vice president and as director of the Tarrant County Bar Association. She is a member of the Appellate Practice and Advocacy Section of the State Bar of Texas, the Appellate Section of the Tarrant County Bar Association, the College of the State Bar of Texas, a charter and sustaining fellow of the Tarrant County Bar Foundation and an emeritus member of the Eldon B. Mahon Chapter of the American Inns of Court.

Kevin Glasheen

Glasheen is an attorney at Glasheen, Valles & Inderman LLP and president of the Texas Tech University School of Law Alumni Association, which he was instrumental in reviving in 2012.

Glasheen attended Texas Tech Law after receiving an undergraduate degree in economics from Texas A&M University.

He opened his own law office immediately out of law school and began handling personal-injury cases. In his first civil-jury trial, Glasheen won a $1 million verdict against Ethicon in San Angelo – a record verdict in Tom Green County. He was lead counsel in two of the largest railroad crossing accident cases in Texas, one resulting in a $65 million verdict and one resulting in a $46 million verdict.

Glasheen represented the family of Timothy Cole, who was wrongfully convicted of a 1985 rape at Texas Tech and died in prison before he was exonerated. Glasheen represented Cole’s family and helped them receive compensation. Since then, Glasheen has represented 12 other clients who were wrongfully convicted like Cole. Glasheen has now teamed up with Bob Pottroff of Kansas to represent victims of a Union Pacific train accident during a parade honoring wounded veterans in Midland.

Glasheen was named a Super Lawyer by Texas Monthly from 2004-2010. In 2005, a poll of Lubbock attorneys selected Glasheen as best plaintiff’s personal injury lawyer. Glasheen serves on the Board of Directors of the Texas Tech Law School Foundation and the Board of Directors of the South Plains Council of the Boy Scouts of America.

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Texas Tech School of Law
The Texas Tech School of Law

The Texas Tech School of Law is a leader among Texas law schools with a 16-year average pass rate of 90 percent on the State Bar Exam.

A small student body, a diverse faculty and a low student-faculty ratio (15.3:1) promotes learning and encourages interaction between students and professors.