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Schools of Law and Business Listed in Princeton Review

The School of Law and the Rawls College of Business have positions in the 2011 editions of The Best 172 Law Schools and The Best 300 Business Schools, respectively.

Written by Leslie Cranford

Princeton Review Best Law Schools Princeton Review Best Law Schools

Texas Tech’s School of Law and Rawls College of Business have garnered positions in the 2011 Princeton Review’s The Best 172 Law Schools and The Best 300 Business Schools, respectively. The comprehensive reference books are available at book stores.

The Princeton Review does not rank the schools on a single hierarchical list or name one school best overall. Instead, the book has 11 ranking lists of the top 10 schools in various categories.

Each school that appears in the Best 300 Business Schools and in the Best 172 Law Schools received an Admissions Selectivity rating, and the schools from which they received student surveys were also given Academic Experience, Professors Interesting, Professors Accessible and Career ratings. Only the top 10 schools in each of the 11 ranking categories appear on the ranking lists.

About the Rawls College, the article said “an executive-style MBA for physicians and dentists helps train medical professionals who are as proficient at business as they are at healing.” Texas Tech, one student observes, is “not so large and accomplished that everyone has a sense of entitlement and arrogance, yet it’s not small and struggling to keep its head above water.”

The article goes on to say that the Rawls College is large enough to offer a broad selection of concentrations, including agribusiness, entrepreneurship, health organization management, MIS, real estate and international business. Instructors in these disciplines are, said one student, beyond knowledgeable in their fields and are also easy to access for questions about course work or the job market in their particular field. “I have never met anyone within the program that was not willing to help the students succeed.”

In the listing for Texas Tech School of Law, the article said that when it’s time to start looking for a job or clerkship, Texas Tech maintains “a great reputation in the Texas legal markets as producing hard-working, effective lawyers,” and that students choose Texas Tech precisely for that reputation and are proud of the results.

A third-year law student said, “I’ve been told on several occasions that a firm would rather pick up a Texas Tech law graduate who knows what to do when he steps foot in the office than some Ivy League grad who knows more about theory and less about how to get the job done.”

The Princeton Review compiled the lists based on its surveys of 18,000 students at the best ABA-accredited law programs in the country and gathered statistical information on many more law programs (including several in Canada) and 19,000 students attending the at the best AACSB-accredited MBA programs in the world, and on school-reported data. Only schools that permitted the Princeton Review to survey their students were eligible for consideration for these lists.

Conducted during the 2009-10, 2008-09, and 2007-08 academic years, on average, about 100 students at each law school and 65 students at each business school were surveyed for the lists in the 2011 editions of the books.

The lists are posted at www.PrincetonReview.com. All narrative profiles and ranking lists in the law school book are available at www.PrincetonReview.com/law/, with similar business college information at http://www.PrincetonReview.com/mba/.

The books are two of 200 Princeton Review titles published by Random House.  The company is not affiliated with Princeton University.

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