TTU Home Communications & Marketing Home Texas Tech Today

The Double T Bench: A History Rich with Student Involvement and Tradition

When the senior class met in 1931, it came up with an idea to leave an impression on Texas Tech for future students to enjoy.

Written by Kendall Rompf

Donated to the university by the senior class of 1931, the bench has been a part of the campus landscape for more than 70 years.

Donated to the university by the senior class of 1931, the bench has been a part of the campus landscape for more than 70 years.

Buried beneath the mysterious nature of the Double T Bench is a history rich with student involvement. Donated to the university by the senior class of 1931, the bench has been a part of the campus landscape for more than 70 years.

When the senior class met in 1931, it came up with an idea to leave an impression on Texas Tech for future students to enjoy. B.A. Brady, an architectural engineering major, was approached by his classmate Floyd Woolridge and asked to draw up plans for the bench.

After perfecting his plans, Brady presented his drawings at a senior meeting. During the meeting, he discovered two other architects had also been approached with the idea. In the end, Brady’s hard work paid off and the Double T Bench, with his original design, was erected on June 6, 1931, in the courtyard behind the Administration Building.

Brady, in a 1980 interview, said his plans were accepted because he worked hard to make the bench as large as possible.

“The spacing in there, to make that thing balance out,” he said, “it couldn’t be much bigger and it couldn’t be any smaller than what it is.”

At the time the Double T Bench became a campus structure, Brady said Texas Tech consisted of only nine buildings including the Administration Building, the powerhouse and a dairy barn. Since then, the campus has grown and changed so much he was not able to locate the bench he designed during a class reunion in 1980.

“I was trying to find it,” he said. “I wanted to see if it was still there. And lo and behold I got lost and drove around the campus for about 30 minutes. There’s a lot of difference in 50 years.”

Through seasons and across decades, the Double T bench sits as a testimony to the rich history of student involvement on the campus.

Through seasons and across decades, the Double T bench sits as a testimony to the rich history of student involvement on the campus.

Although Brady was never able to locate it that year, the Double T Bench remains a part of Texas Tech for all to enjoy and speculate about for years to come.

On campus, it is an announced tradition that no freshmen are allowed to sit on the Double T Bench, and it has also been reported that if a girl wants a date to a football game, all she has to do is sit and a date will find her. Luckily, students have an easier time finding the bench than Brady did.

FacebookTwitterLinkedInGoogle GmailTumblrGoogle+RedditShare


8 Responses to “The Double T Bench: A History Rich with Student Involvement and Tradition”

  1. Denise Brent-Rotello Says:

    Wow, the bench is really neat! However, during my 4 1/2 years at Tech from 1985-1989, I never even heard of the bench or the traditions associated with it. Wish I could’ve seen it! Will have to search for it next time I’m on campus.

  2. Jack Moore Says:

    It is neat. But I graduated in 1960 (journalism!) and never heard of it. We were too excited then about the Southwest Conference circle. Where on campus wasit located?

  3. Kelly Brown Says:

    Go to bing.com, click on maps, enter “lubbock, tx”, and then keeping zooming in on the campus and the Administration Building. You can see it in the courtyard. (googlemaps and others will probably work as well).

  4. Phil Price Says:

    Nicely written piece of Tech history. I wonder if students know the statue is of Governor Preston Smith and how important he was to Tech and HSC.

  5. Jim S. Green Says:

    Traditions at Tech
    And don’t forget old Will and his faithful steed , “Soapsuds”,who still gets TPed during football season. The many traditions, some of which are not well publicized, like the Blarney stone behind the West Engineering building are amoung the few we remember. As I recall there are verbals also and we all have our favorites, lest we forget.

  6. bmarks Says:

    How could anyone miss the Double T Bench! ? For years it was on a direct line due north from the UC to the Administration Building via the parking lot. Perhaps the layout has changed since my time (graduated 1978) but it’s hard to even be around the Admin building without stumbling over the The Double T bench. Personal opinion: the Preston Smith statue is ill-placed and detracts from the Double T Bench. But as a former Governor and Tech alum he deserves recognition.

  7. Glen Reid Baker Says:

    I do remember the bench from my years at Tech (60-64), but don’t ever remember knowing about the origens and traditions. What a shame….I love the idea of both. Glad to know SOME things haven’t changed on campus even with all the improvements and modernization!

  8. Grace Holman Says:

    (Grad. 1964) Interesting historical tidbit about the Double T Bench. Too often items are seen as merely a part of the landscape. To have created and added the bench in 1931 would have been a monentary feat, considering the Depression. The Class of 1931 is to be commended.

Leave a Reply